The Art of Thinking Clearly by Rolf Dobelli (2013)

“The contrast effect is a common is a common misconception. We judge something to be beautiful, expensive or large if we have something ugly, cheap or small in front of us. We have difficulty with absolute judgements. …Without the contrast effect, the discount business would be completely untenable. A product that has been reduced from $100 to $70 seems better value than a product that has always cost $70. The starting price should play no role. The other day an investor told me: ‘The share is a great value because it’s 50 per cent below the peak price.’ I shook my head. A share price is never ‘low’ or ‘high’. It is what it is, and the only thing that matters is whether it goes up or down from that point.”
(excerpt from Leave Your Supermodel Friends At Home)

“If you want to convince someone about something, don’t focus on the advantages; instead highlight how it helps them dodge the disadvantages. Social scientists call this loss aversion.”
(excerpt from Why Evil Strikes Harder Than Good)

“What makes a professional tennis player like Roger Federer a coffee machine expert is still open for debate, but this hasn’t detracted from the success of the campaign. We are so used to seeing celebrities promoting arbitrary products that we never stop to consider why their support should be of any importance to us. But this is exactly the sneaky part of the halo effect: it works on a subconscious level. All that needs to register is the attractive face, dream lifestyle – and that product.”
(excerpt from Everyone is Beautiful at the Top)

“In the past, I sympathised with so-called ‘early adopters’, the breed of people who cannot survive without the latest iPhone. I thought they were ahead of their time. Now I regard them as irrational and suffering from a kind of sickness: neomania. To them, it is of minor importance if an invention provides tangible benefits; novelty matters more.”
(excerpt from Disregard the Brand New)

“Many things spark envy: ownership, status, health, youth, talent, popularity, beauty. It is often confused with jealousy because the physical reactions are identical. The difference: the subject of envy is a thing (status, money, health, etc.) The subject of jealousy is the behaviour of a third person. Envy needs two people. Jealousy, on the other hand, requires three.”
(excerpt from Build Your Own Castle)