TheArtOfThinkingClearly-covers

The Art of Thinking Clearly by Rolf Dobelli (2013)

“The contrast effect is a common is a common misconception. We judge something to be beautiful, expensive or large if we have something ugly, cheap or small in front of us. We have difficulty with absolute judgements. …Without the contrast effect, the discount business would be completely untenable. A product that has been reduced from $100 to $70 seems better value than a product that has always cost $70. The starting price should play no role. The other day an investor told me: ‘The share is a great value because it’s 50 per cent below the peak price.’ I shook my head. A share price is never ‘low’ or ‘high’. It is what it is, and the only thing that matters is whether it goes up or down from that point.”
(excerpt from Leave Your Supermodel Friends At Home)

“If you want to convince someone about something, don’t focus on the advantages; instead highlight how it helps them dodge the disadvantages. Social scientists call this loss aversion.”
(excerpt from Why Evil Strikes Harder Than Good)

“What makes a professional tennis player like Roger Federer a coffee machine expert is still open for debate, but this hasn’t detracted from the success of the campaign. We are so used to seeing celebrities promoting arbitrary products that we never stop to consider why their support should be of any importance to us. But this is exactly the sneaky part of the halo effect: it works on a subconscious level. All that needs to register is the attractive face, dream lifestyle – and that product.”
(excerpt from Everyone is Beautiful at the Top)

“In the past, I sympathised with so-called ‘early adopters’, the breed of people who cannot survive without the latest iPhone. I thought they were ahead of their time. Now I regard them as irrational and suffering from a kind of sickness: neomania. To them, it is of minor importance if an invention provides tangible benefits; novelty matters more.”
(excerpt from Disregard the Brand New)

“Many things spark envy: ownership, status, health, youth, talent, popularity, beauty. It is often confused with jealousy because the physical reactions are identical. The difference: the subject of envy is a thing (status, money, health, etc.) The subject of jealousy is the behaviour of a third person. Envy needs two people. Jealousy, on the other hand, requires three.”
(excerpt from Build Your Own Castle)

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How to have great ideas by John Ingledew (2016)

Moving Platforms is a highly innovative idea by designer Paul Priestman in which you can travel from your local stop to any destination – even in another country – without getting off a train and without stopping. www.priestmangoode.com Voice your wildest concept

Multidisciplinary designer Jack Schulze found this excellent new function for an iPad, using phographic and animation techniques to draw moving three-dimensional typography. – Ask ‘What esle I can do with this?’

Heatherwick made use of an analogy to design a 2-km stretch of motorway passing through a residential area in northern England. Knowing that egg boxes glued on to the walls of recording studios are used to dampen sound, he just needed to discover a large-scale equivalent – traffic cones. www.heatherwick.comFind an analogy

“Great ideas are often spurred on by an obsession to improve things that don’t work properly.”  James Dyson, inventor – Fix your frustrations

Got a problem? Ask how nature would solve it. Watch natural world documentaries – anything made by David Attenborough – all packed with nature’s inspiring and often surprising adaptations. – Try asking nature

www.tinkeringschool.com, educational programme founded in California by the writer and computer scientist Gever Tulley. – Potter, ponder and tinker

Farrow Design packaged the album Ladies and Gentlemen We Are Floating in Space, by Spiritualized, using a design system commonly found in pharmacies. – Try swapping systems

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Duane Michals, Things Are Queer, 1973. An amazing cyclical story, perfectly planned and executed by the artist and photographer. – Be a storyteller

ideasareyouronlycurrency_3covers

Ideas are your only currency by Rod Judkins (2017)

‘Intelligent Optimist’ – The intelligent are realists. They see things for what they are. They try not to let emotion cloud their judgement. On the other hand, optimists are delusional. They leap around like spring lambs, exploring for the sake of exploring. With playful eagerness they try to make the problems, how could someone clever be optimistic? The creative are a mixture of intelligence and optimism. They believe they can create better futures, but back it up with intellectual rigor. With a mixture of humor, realism and imagination they look for ways to improve our culture. Instead of mindlessly consuming, they mindfully create.

“If it was possible to evolve, it was also possible to devolve, and that complex organisms could devolve into simpler forms or animals.”Ray Lankester

“Time is the most precious gift you can give to someone, because if you give someone your time, it’s a part of your life that you will never get back.” –Gloria Tesch

“What is great in man is that he is a bridge and not a goal.”Friedrich Nietzsche

Our most costly failure is our obsession with success. We are wrong about what it means to be wrong… There are awards that celebrate every conceivable achievement, except failure.

“Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try again. Fail again. Fail better.”Samuel Beckett

“To eat is a necessity, but to eat intelligently is an art.” –La Rochefoucauld

BookOfTea_covers

The Book Of Tea by Kakuzo Okakura

Teaism is a cult founded in the adoration of the beautiful among the sordid facts of everyday existence. It inculcates purity and harmony, the mystery of mutual charity, the romanticism of the social order. It is essentially a worship of the Imperfect, as it is a tender attempt to accomplish something possible in this impossible thing we know as life.
(The Cup of Humanity)

For life is an expression, our unconscious actions the constant betrayal of our innermost thought. Confucius said that ‘man hideth not’. Perhaps we reveal ourselves too much in small things because we have so little of the great to conceal.
(Taoism & Zennism)

We are ever brutal to those who love and serve us in silence, but the time may come when, for our cruelty, we shall be deserted by these best friends of ours.
(Flowers)

NakanoTriftShop

The Nakano Trift Shop by Hiromi Kawakami (2016)

There are plenty of people in the world I don’t dislike, some whom I almost like; on the other hand, I almost hate some of whom I don’t dislike, too. But how many people did I truly love? – Hitomi

…men and women have carnal urges, and people fall in love with each other in order to satisfy those (sexual) desires, don’t they? We can call it love or passion or various other things, but you know, no matter how pretty the paper that you wrap it up in, when all is said and done, the primary force that drives people towards one another is still the same sensuality. – Masayo

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We Are All Weird by Seth Godin (2011)

RICH is my word for someone who can afford to make choices, who has enough resources to do more than merely survive. You don’t need a private plane to be rich, but you do need enough time and food and health and access to be able to interact with the market for stuff and for ideas.

As soon as consumers enter the marketplace, they gain power, because power comes from choice. Consumer power is a brand new force.

We all share communication tools. Most of us share the same three or four languages. We all share the same planet. But we’re not the same. We’re people with choices, and we won’t alter those choices merely because we used to have no choice.

聰明丸 by 李碧華 (1997)

別對「親情」期望過高,雖然你失意時家人總在身邊,但爭產時也是。

愛情不能勉強,埋單也是。

鬥氣不如爭氣,爭氣不如爭財。千萬別爭風,殺傷力最大。

愛一個人,先要敬重他。愛會淡,但敬意漸濃。

真假美人湯 by 李碧華 (2001)

兩疊「金鏤衣」
詩曰:「勸君莫惜金鏤衣,勸君惜取少年時。花開堪折直須折,莫待無花空折枝」。現實中,少年時惜不惜取一樣過去,金鏤衣是我們的必需品,–不過鈔票「無花」可能是偽鈔,收到後又如常使用,屬商業罪案。不止空折枝,還白白損失兼入官門,好無辜。

有病
不一定名人,升斗市民中每七個便有一個有問題。
有時電郵上也遇到,總有一兩個好像不用上學上班,「熱愛」e-mail或連寫六七頁,自言自語,罵這罵那,很無聊。一見使按掣delete,不看、不複雜、不覆。隔天又來了?真無奈。–幸好不多,多幾個連我們也有病。